Bouncing Ideas

Just another place in cyberspace for me to pour forth the thoughts running through my head. Idle as they may be.

(Source: billieviper, via fadewithfury)

wlovepierce:

If you aren’t following @StatsBritain you aren’t doing Twitter right.

(via sherlollymouse)

Windows Media Player 9 Skins

theheroheart:

devildoll:

thirddeadlysin:

boddah-and-kurt:

dougaitken:

ms-dos5:

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the struggle was real. 

that last one is ugly

…just the last one????

I had an X-Men one made by a fan. Was it maybe you, brbshittoavenge?

God, but do you remember how you could make custom Winamp skins though? Cause that was awesome.

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and hell, you could even make them selectively see-through

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that shit was dope

anindoorkitty:

"Have you any interest in me?" ”You are beautiful. You’ll make a beautiful wife.” ”Victor, what do you think I am, a specimen? Kiss me Victor, touch me. Feel my heart beat. Must you go? Can’t you stay?”

(via mistykins06)

tastefullyoffensive:

[fartywings]

armylock:

Current sexuality: Ben C’s stubble

(via mollyandherjumper)

jemhenstridge:

What is so amazing about the women in Agents of SHIELD is how real their skills in their respective fields feel. The three women of Agents SHIELD don’t have skill in place of character: they have skill as an inextricable part of character. Skye, the hacker, learned her skill out of a desire to discover the truth of her past. Jemma Simmons, the scientist, not only speaks candidly about the isolation of pursuing advanced education in science, but has the tics and social awkwardness to show for it. And Agent May, the pilot and combat specialist, pursues the honing of her skills with a dedication that has a real human cost and a profound effect on the way she interacts with others. These are characters who worked hard to gain their skills, and who had to make very real sacrifices to make it to the tops of their respective fields.

Just as importantly, all three are women. I know it seems like an obvious thing to say, but their being women is about much more than just their gender. All three women are undeniably attractive, but all three also steer well clear of the impossibly beautiful supergenius trope that plagues intelligent women on screen. Each has a distinct personal style, just like real women do, from Skye’s slightly grungy casual, to Simmons’ buttoned-up preppiness, to May’s no-nonsense black combat gear. Better still, though there’s not a push-up bra or a high-heeled shoe in sight, none of the three women deny their femininity in the way they present themselves, either. Skye curls her hair and wears eye makeup. Simmons wears clothes that are practical for a lab, but that are coordinated and full of appealing feminine details. Even May, who could easily hide her body under androgynous combat fatigues, wears clothing that contours to her shape. She doesn’t flaunt her body, certainly; but she doesn’t deny it either.

But the very best thing about the women of Agents of SHIELD? The fact that they are women at the very top of traditionally male-dominated fields isn’t even remarked upon. Should we celebrate when women make strides in fields historically closed to them? Of course. But the mark of real progress in equality in those fields is when women can succeed in them because of course they can. That’s what makes the women of Agents of SHIELD so downright remarkable.

(x)

(Source: danverskate, via thewinterspy)

scoutlover:

elphabaheartshaven:

THAT’S IT. I AM SO DONE WITH THIS MAN.
I can’t handle the cuteness…..

That’s me done, then.

scoutlover:

elphabaheartshaven:

THAT’S IT. I AM SO DONE WITH THIS MAN.

I can’t handle the cuteness…..

That’s me done, then.

(via lumos5001)

mumblingsage:

yamino:

iamingrid:

yamino:

omgthatdress:

Half-Mourning Dress
1910-1912
The Victoria & Albert Museum

What’s a “half-mourning” dress?  Mourning in the front, party in the back?

Half-Mourning was the third stage of mourning for a widow. She would be expected to mourn her husband for at least two years, the stages being Full Mourning, Second Mourning and Half-Mourning. The different stages regulated what they would be wearing, with Full Mourning being all black and with no ornamentation, including the wodow’s veil, and the stages after that introducing some jewellery and modest ornamentation. When in Half-Mourning you would gradually include fabrics in other colors and sort of ease your way out of mourning. 
Wow, I am happy you made that joke so I could interpert it as a serious question and have an excuse to ramble on about clothing customs of the past, I am a historical fashion nerd.

That’s very informative, but I’m going to stick with my original head canon:


I love both the informed fashion history and the hilariously off-the-wall halves of this post.

mumblingsage:

yamino:

iamingrid:

yamino:

omgthatdress:

Half-Mourning Dress

1910-1912

The Victoria & Albert Museum

What’s a “half-mourning” dress?  Mourning in the front, party in the back?

Half-Mourning was the third stage of mourning for a widow. She would be expected to mourn her husband for at least two years, the stages being Full Mourning, Second Mourning and Half-Mourning. The different stages regulated what they would be wearing, with Full Mourning being all black and with no ornamentation, including the wodow’s veil, and the stages after that introducing some jewellery and modest ornamentation. When in Half-Mourning you would gradually include fabrics in other colors and sort of ease your way out of mourning. 

Wow, I am happy you made that joke so I could interpert it as a serious question and have an excuse to ramble on about clothing customs of the past, I am a historical fashion nerd.

That’s very informative, but I’m going to stick with my original head canon:

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I love both the informed fashion history and the hilariously off-the-wall halves of this post.

(via thenthereweresunspots)